Allergies

Allergies are the over reaction of the immune system to non-harmful substances. There is often an increase in histamine levels due to poor gut function which stimulates the immune mast cells respond and cause symptoms such as eczema, asthma, difficulty breathing and swelling. Allergies can be to anything including foods, pollen, chemicals and animals.

What can I do?

Eat a nutrient rich diet including 7 portions of vegetables and 2 fruits per day. It should contain 2 portions of quercetin rich foods per day from leeks, apples, onions and garlic. This will get you on your way to consuming many of the nutrients you need for a normal immune system.

De-stress. Stress is a major cause of immune dysregulation. This is because stress affects the gut and allergies and problems with immunity always start in the gut. The cells in the gut wall usually move apart with stress, allowing small food particles to enter the blood stream and activate the immune system.

Keep a food diary. Even if the allergen is environmental such as to pollen or dust mites, there may be dietary allergens which intensifies your reaction.

What can I take?

  • Vitamin D is needed for the normal function of the immune system and a deficiency may result in a dysregulation and allergies. Vitamin D does get stored in the body, so a vitamin D test is always advisable.
  • Clinoptilolite binds to histamine in the body and removes it, eventually decreasing circulating histamine levels and reducing allergic responses.
  • Live cultures exists naturally in the gut and are often found in low numbers in people with allergic conditions. Live cultures typically consist of lactobacillus and bifidobactum strains. Look for a live culture supplement with as many strains as possible.
  • Colostrum is the first milk that the cow produces for the calf, and it communicates to the calf’s immune system as to how to behave. Colostrum supplements have the active components isolated and concentrated.
  • Dao (Diamine Oxidase) is the enzyme that breaks down histamine, and is often lacking or in short supply in people with allergic condition.

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Candida

Candida is a type of yeast that naturally exists within the body. People often experience symptoms associated with a candida overgrowth such as thrush, athletes food, dandruff, fungal nail infection and generally feeling unwell. Candida only usually causes a problem when our immune system is decreased and it is allowed to proliferate.

What can I do?

Balance blood sugars. This means eating protein and carbohydrates every 2.5 to 3 hours and cut out all refined carbohydrates to avoid blood sugar dips and peaks. When we have blood sugar spikes, our immune system is compromised and this allows candida the opportunity to grow uncontrollably. When we have blood sugar dips, our body releases the stress hormone which also decreases immune function.

Consume a nutrient rich diet including 7 portions of vegetables and 2 low sugar fruits per day. This will provide many nutrients needed for the immune system such as vitamin C, copper, folate and vitamin B6. This will also contain fibre which may help with elimination and the removal of dead yeast.

De-stress. Stress is a major immune system depressor and needs to be actively managed. Activates such as meditation, massages and walking in nature may help immensely. You will also need to address the direct cause of stress.

What can I take?

  • Garlic contributes to immunity and helps to maintain your body’s natural defence. It is very important to keep your immune system and your natural defences healthy in order to combat candida. The likely reason we have it is due to a drop in immunity in the first place.
  • Vitamin C. Our need for vitamin C dramatically increases when we have an infection. Vitamin C contributes towards immunity by activation Natural killer immune cells, which are needed to fight a candida infection.
  • Vitamin D is needed for immunity, and most of the UK population do not have high enough levels. A vitamin D test is recommended however, because vitamin D does get stored in the body, and guidance on an appropriate dose is needed.
  • Live cultures such as lactobacillus grow naturally in our bodies and in our guts. In the case of candida infection, these numbers are often low. Environmental factors such as antibiotics as medicine, residue in food and antimicrobial everything from mouth wash and chlorine in tap water can decrease numbers of bacteria in the body.

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Cholesterol

Cholesterol is a fatty substance that is produced by the liver and is absorbed from the diet. It is used to make hormones and has many other functions in the body. When cholesterol levels become too high however, it increases your risk of cardiovascular disease. There are 2 types of cholesterol, LDL (bad cholesterol) and HDL (good cholesterol)

What can I do?

Increase fibre in the diet. This helps to trap bile and move it out of the body. Your body needs to then make more bile out of cholesterol which reduces the cholesterol stored in your body

Eat a nutrient rich diet consisting of 7 portions of vegetables and 2 fruits per day. Protein such as lean poultry, beans and lentils are required and limits your cholesterol intake.

Include healthy fats such as cold pressed olive oil (containing oleic acid) which contributes towards the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels when healthy oils are in the place of saturated fats. Other cold pressed oils such as flax oil, pumpkin seed oil and hemp oil which are all poly unsaturated oil which contributes to the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels.

Consume flax seeds, chia seeds, hemp seed and their oils. They contain Alpha-linolenic acid (ALA) which contributes to the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels.

Consume whole rolled oats daily. They contain beta glucans which have been shown to lower/reduce blood cholesterol.

What can I take?

  • Plant stanols have been shown to lower blood cholesterol. They compete with the cholesterol in your diet for absorption.
  • Glucomannan (konjac fibre) contributes to the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels by helping to remove bile (made from cholesterol out of the body).
  • Monascus purpureous (red yeast rice) contains monacolin K and contributes to the maintenance of normal blood cholesterol levels. It works by reducing the amount of cholesterol produced by the liver.
  • Lecithin contains high amounts of choline which contributes to normal fat metabolism by reducing the quantity of cholesterol absorbed by the body.
  • CoQ10. Cholesterol lowering medication blocks your body’s ability to create CoQ10, and therefore it must be replace with a supplement. Always check with your doctor or pharmacist first however.

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Colds & Flu

Colds and flu can strike at any time, however particularly in the winter. This is known as flu season, however flu is not a season – it is an inability of our body to deal with the lower fruit (vitamin C) consumption, the reduction in exercise, sunlight and fresh air and the increase in sugar consumptions and stress.

What can I do?

Eat a nutrient rich diet consisting of 7 portions of vegetables and 2 fruits per day. This will help to provide nutrition such as vitamin C and Zinc which are needed for the immune system. We also need a good supply of protein and healthy fats.

Get out in nature. When we are out in nature we come into contact with plant chemicals call phytoncides. They phytoncides stimulate our immune system and make us more resistant to colds and flu.

De-stress. Stress is a major immune system depressor and coping mechanisms need to be put into place. Schedule in a minimum of 30 minutes of relaxation time per day.

What can I take?

  • Multivitamin and mineral provides many nutrients needed for the immune system such as copper, folic acid, selenium, iron, vitamin A, B6 and B12. In times of illness, our need for nutrition increases, and extra nutrition may support prevention.
  • Vitamin C contributes to the normal function of the immune system. When we are ill, our need for vitamin C dramatically increases, and it is hard to get as much vitamin C as we need through diet alone.
  • Vitamin D contributes to the normal function of the immune system, and due to the lack of sunlight in the winter, and even exposure in the summer, we are often left deficient. Vitamin D does get stored I the body however so it is always advisable to take a vitamin D test.
  • Zinc contributes towards the maintenance of a normal immune system, by activating natural killer immune cells.
  • Garlic contributes to immunity and may be beneficial to take during a cold or flu.
  • Shilajit is a mushroom that has significant antioxidant properties. It supports the balanced function of the immune system.

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Detox

Cleaning out your body can be beneficial to health. Every day we get exposed to many toxins which if we do not remove from our body, get stored in our body tissues. Once in our tissues, they can affect the way in which our body works, such as interfering with the energy production cycle. Many overweight people struggle to lose weight because of an excess of stored toxins in fat cells, and it is only when we clear these toxins, they allow us to lose weight.

What can I do?

Decrease exposure to environmental toxins. This means filtering your water, eating organic food, using glass or ceramic cookware and food storage containers and using natural cosmetics and toiletries.

Consume a nutrient and fibre rich diet, which consists of 7 portions of vegetables and 2 fruits. This will provide bulk to help carry toxins that have been extracted by the liver out of the body.

Drink a minimum of 2 litres per day of purified water to help your body remove excess toxins from the body. If you are detoxing to lose weight, extra water is needed in order for your body to use fat as energy.

Exercise daily for increased blood flow to the liver. Sweating also helps your body get rid of some toxins through the skin.

What can I take?

  • Greens powder contains many nutrients such as vitamin E and C which contributes to the protection of cells from oxidative stress. Antioxidants help to protect cells that may have become damaged when originally exposed to the toxin.
  • Clinoptilolite binds to toxins in the gut including heavy metals and histamines and removes them from the body, taking the burden off of the liver and kidneys and allowing your body to detoxify its stored toxins.
  • Chlorella is a type of blue-green algae that helps eliminate heavy metals from the body and promotes health.
  • Milk thistle is an herb that contributes towards the liver detoxification potential, helping you to remove toxins from your body.

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Digestion

70% of woman and many men suffer from digestive issues and discomfort. This can be from indigestion, acid reflux, bloating, excess gas, cramping, diarrhoea and constipation. It has a huge impact on quality of life. Fortunately, there are things that can be done.

What can I do?

Chew your food a minimum of 30 times. This is important to stimulate the production of HCL in order to break down food properly.

Eat smaller meals and more often. Smaller meals are easier to digest and think about food. Focus on eating and not anything else such as watching TV.

Consume a nutrient and fibre rich diet consisting of 7 portions of vegetables and 2 fruits per day. This will provide many nutrients needed for gut health, as healthy bowel movements.

Reduce sugar consumption as excess amounts encourage detrimental organisms to thrive in the gut.

What can I take?

  • Digestive enzymes are produced naturally in the gut and are required for the breakdown of protein, carbohydrates and fats. Sometimes, our body may not produce enough to break down food effectively.
  • Live cultures may be helpful to digestion, particularly in the breakdown of foods such as lactose.
  • Clinoptilolite binds to toxins in the gut and alleviates gas, bloating, diarrhoea and IBS.
  • Peppermint contributes to digestive comfort. It helps to relax the intestinal muscles, helping gas to pass.
  • Marsh Mallow supports bowel performance and may be beneficial to those with deregulated bowel movements.

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Female Fertility

40% of infertility cases are down to the female and 20% due to male and female factors. Subfertility can be a very difficult subject to deal with and have many causes.

What can I do?

Consume a nutrient rich diet that consists of 7 portions of vegetables per day and 2 fruits. You also need adequate protein and healthy fats. This will help provide the nutrients needed for fertility such as zinc. You also need a good supply of folate for material tissue growth.

Stop smoking. Smoking decreases the strength of the finger like projections that move the eggs along the fallopian tube. This is why smoking increases your chance of an ectopic pregnancy.

De-stress. Stress is a major cause of sub-fertility. This is because when your body is stressed, it is focused on survival and not on reproduction. Stress reviving techniques such as meditation, walking in nature and massages, as well as addressing the main causes of stress can have a massive impact.

Keep track of you cycle and not the times in which you are most fertile. Female fertility is characterised by clear vaginal mucus which stretches between your fingers, a lower position of the cervix and increased libido. Your partner needs a fresh supply of sperm, and ideally be ejaculating every 2 days. Regular sex should occur, and your optimal chance of conceive occurs when you have sex 3 times per week.

Balance blood sugars by eating protein and carbohydrates every 2.5 to 3 hours to avoid blood sugar dips and peaks. Chronically elevated blood sugar levels are a factor in PCOS and deregulated hormones which may interfere with conception.

Reduce exposure to environmental toxins. Environmental toxins such as BPA mimic hormones in the body and interfere with fertility. Switch to chemical free toiletries and cosmetics, switch to organic food and use glass, stainless steel or ceramic cookware and food storage containers.

What can I take?

  • A pre-conception multi contains nutrients which are essential for health, well-being and the proper maturation of the egg. Nutrients such as folate are needed for proper tissue growth. A preconception multi will also have appropriate dose of vitamin A, which should not be take in high levels due it causing mutations in the foetus. Vitamin A deficiency can also cause problems.
  • Pregnancy fish oil contains higher levels of DHA compared to an everyday fish oil. DHA is needed for the development of the foetus’s brain and it is a good idea to start building up your stores. Omega 3 fats are also needed for the production of hormones, so important for fertility.
  • Vitamin D is needed for the production of hormones, and is often found to be low in the UK population. Vitamin D is fat soluble however, so a vitamin D test is always recommended.
  • Clinoptilolite is a mineral that helps to remove toxins from the body that may be interfering with fertility. Many toxins can accumulate over time, some of which interfere with the way in which we process the nutrition we need for conception.
  • Maca is a root vegetable from peru that has a beneficial influence on fertility and can be added to foods or taken in a capsule.

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Hair Skin and Nails

Hair skin and nails are made up out of the same type of cells. These cells are flattened for skin, compressed for nails and stacked on top of each other for hair. They are all fast growing cells and need a good supply of nutrition to be healthy.

What can I do?

Eat a nutrient rich diet consisting of 7 portions of vegetables and 2 fruits per day. This will help to provide nutrition needed for the creation of hair, skin and nail cells. We also need a good supply of protein and healthy fats.

Exercise helps to increase blood flow to the skin and scalp which increases the nutrients that are available for hair skin and nails. Exercise also increases blood flow to the liver which aids with detoxification and preventing the release of toxins from the skin.

Use natural cosmetics and toiletries which are nourishing to the skin. The average female puts around 500 different chemicals on her skin hair and nails per day which is detrimental.

Increase fibre. This helps to remove toxins out of the body before they can get reabsorbed and released onto the skin. Ensure that all of your grains are whole grains.

What can I take?

  • Hair skin and nails formula contains nutrients such as biotin which contributes towards the maintenance of normal hair and skin. They may also contain vitamin B2, B3 and iodine which contributes to normal skin, and selenium which is needed for normal nails.
  • Vitamin C is needed for collagen production for the skin. Collagen is a main component of skin structure and elasticity.
  • Copper is needed for normal hair and skin pigmentation, and a deficiency can cause early greying.
  • Zinc is needed for hair, skin and nails, and is essential to be taken alongside copper as they work together.
  • Vitamin A is a fat soluble vitamin which is needed for normal skin. Vitamin A deficiency may cause Keratosis pilaris, which are small red bumps on the skin.
  • Protein is broken down into amino acids in the body and these are then used as building blocks for all cells, and particularly rapidly growing cells.
  • Fish oil is a poly unsaturated fatty acid which is needed for the membrane of skin cells. When we take polyunsaturated fatty acids and reduce our consumption of saturated fatty acids, the membrane of the cells, particularly the skin cells become flexible.

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Male Fertility

Infertility in due to 40% of men and a 20% combination of both men and woman. It is mainly down to low sperm count and dysfunctional sperm and the cause can be multifactorial.

What can I do?

Consume a nutrient rich diet including 7 portions of vegetables per day and 2 fruits. You also need adequate protein and healthy fats daily. This will contain many nutrients such as zinc and selenium, which contribute to fertility.

Stop smoking. Smoking decreases sperm count and decrease quality of sperm and should be stopped.

Reduce stress. Stress has a major impact on fertility, and many couples conceive when on holiday due to stress being dramatically decreased. When our body is stressed, reproduction is not a focus priority.

Ejaculate every 2 days. To maximise your chance of conception and to ensure a fresh supply of sperm.

What can I take?

  • Male multivitamin and mineral contains many nutrients necessary for fertility such as zinc and selenium. It may also contain L-arginine, an amino acid which converts into Nitric Oxide which is needed to get and maintain and erection. Nutrients such as copper are needed or the production of DNA, essential for reproduction.
  • Fish oil contains omega 3 DHA which makes up an essential part of the sperms head and should be included.
  • Greens such as wheat grass and barley grass contain many nutrients such as vitamin E, which contribute to the production of DNA.
  • Ashwagandha helps maintain sperm mobility and sperm count ad may be particularly beneficial for those wishing to conceive.

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Memory and Concentration

Decreased memory and concentration are common complaints; however fortunately, there are a few things that can help.

What can I do?

Eat a nutrient rich diet consisting of 7 portions of vegetables and fruits which will provide many nutrients which are needed to support brain health. Healthy fats and adequate protein are also needed.

Balance blood sugars by eating complex carbohydrates and protein every 2.5 to 3 hours. This helps to avoid peaks and dips and ensure a steady supply of glucose to the brain.

Exercise helps to increase blood flow to the brain which increases nutrition and oxygen to the brain cells.

Practice makes perfect. Maths games and puzzles, playing a musical instrument and taking a dance class can increase your memory and concentration significantly. They stimulate the part of your brain for memory and concentration and make new connections in the brain cells.

Meditation can improve concentration and give the mind a sense of calm. Try 5 minutes per day building up to 20 minutes per day.

Stay hydrated. Water contributes towards normal brain function and cognition. You may find it beneficial to hydrate with coconut water or electrolyte solution.

What can I take?

  • Fish oil contains omega 3 EPA and DHA. DHA is needed for normal brain function and a deficiency can cause a decrease in memory and concentration.
  • B complex vitamins are needed for the health of the nervous tissue in the brain, especially vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B12. B vitamins work together and complement each other so a complex is recommended.
  • Ginkgo biloba helps to maintain good cognitive function by stimulating blood flow to the brain.
  • Co enzyme Q10 is found abundantly in brain, and as our natural production starts to decline past the age of 30, we may also see a decline in mental function.
  • Iodine is needed for normal cognitive function and is found in large quantities in the brain.
  • Zinc is needed for normal cognitive function as it regulates the communication between nerve cells.

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Menopause

The menopause is the age related absence of menstruation in females. Most of the unpleasant symptoms that accompany this life stage happen in peri menopause which starts around 2 years before the complete absence of menstruation. There are many symptoms of menopause such as hot flushes, low moods, fatigue, insomnia and aching muscles. These symptoms are due to the sharp drop in oestrogen and progesterone.

What can I do?

Consume a diet rich in phytoestrogens such as chickpeas, sesame and beans. Phytoestrogens have a similar structure to oestrogens and act on cell receptors in place of oestrogens.

Balance blood sugars by eating complex carbohydrates and protein every 2.5 to 3 hours. This helps to avoid peaks and dips which negatively influences the adrenal glands. There is a close relationship between the adrenal glands and menopause symptoms, because when the ovaries fail to secrete oestrogen, the adrenal glands take over and start to produce a small amount of oestrogen, which dampens down menopausal symptoms.

Relaxation is also really important to nourish your adrenal glands. Try walking in nature, massages, hot baths and meditation.

Exercise is essential to support bone health and weight bearing exercise my help to reduce menopause related bone loss.

What can I take?

  • Bone health multi. Bones start to suffer after the menopause because the oestrogen helps to protect bones, and a sudden loss in oestrogens often leads to a loss in bone density. A bone health multi provides the nutrients needed to support bone health such as calcium, magnesium, vitamin C and vitamin D.
  • Wild yam helps to maintain a calm and comfortable menopause, and helps women coping with the signs associated with menopause, such as hot flushes, sweating, restlessness and irritability.
  • Bee pollen contributes to comfort and well-being during menopause and helps to reduce hot flushes.
  • Sage is an herb that helps with menopausal discomfort and can be taken in capsules or tinctures.
  • Isoflavones have a very similar structure to your body’s natural oestrogen, and are known as phytoestrogens.

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Migraines

Migraines are severe headaches which affect a large proportion of the population. The eyes may be affected and they may also be accompanied with nausea. A visit to the doctor is essential prior to taking supplements.

What can I do?

Look for trigger foods. They are often foods such as chocolate, spices, sulphates, wheat and dairy, however could be many other foods. The easiest way to find trigger foods is to keep a food diary or take a food intolerance test.

Reduce stress. Stress is a major trigger of migraines and also has many other health implications. Address the main causes of stress in your life, as well as taking active stress relieving measures such as meditation, hot bathes and walking in nature.

Eat a nutrient rich diet contains 7 portions of vegetables and 2 fruits per day. You also need good quality protein and healthy fats. This will provide some nutrients needed for nervous health and the health of the brain.

Balance blood sugars. This means eating protein and carbohydrates every 2.5 to 3 hours to avoid blood sugar dips and peaks. Migraines can be triggered by blood sugar dips, so these need to be managed.

What can I take?

  • CoQ10 is naturally produced in the body to serve as fuel for the nerves and the brain. After the age of 30, our natural production declines, and intake through food may not be adequate.
  • Fish oils contain omega 3 DHA which is needed for the brain. A large proportion of our brain is comprised of fat, and we need a constant source.
  • B complex. B vitamins such as Vitamin B1, B2, B6 and B12 are needed for the nervous system. B vitamins work together so a complex containing all of the B vitamins is recommended.
  • Chromium is a mineral which contributes to normal blood glucose levels, which must be kept under control in the case of migraines.

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Mood

There can be many causes of low mood, mood swings and other mood disorders. These can be stress, hormonal factors, poor brain chemistry and poor gut health. The brain is made from nervous tissue, so supporting nerve health will impact on mood.

What can I do?

Consume a nutrient rich diet which consists of adequate protein, essential fats, 7 portions of vegetables and 2 fruits per day. This will provide the nutrients that you need for the production of neurotransmitters which regulate mood.

Get adequate sleep! This is very important for maintaining good moods. Meditation can also be useful in regulating mood and having a positive outlook.

Exercise releases endorphins which enhance mood. Regular exercise also increases blood flow to the brain which increases nutrient and oxygen supply to the brain cells.

What can I take?

  • B complex vitamins contain vitamins B1, B2, B3 and B12 which are needed for normal functioning of the nervous system. They are needed or the coating of the nerve and for nerve communication. B vitamins work together and enhance the function of one another so a complex is always advised.
  • Fish oil contains omega 3 DHA which contributes towards the normal function of the brain. Most of the brain is made up of fats, and a deficiency may result in low moods and brain function.
  • Amino acids are the components of protein and some of them are needed for the production of neurotransmitters. Neurotransmitters regulate mood. The main amino acids used for neurotransmitters are L-tryptophan, L-theanine and phenylalanine. It is advised to take an amino acid complex or protein supplement because the amino acids work in balance with each other.
  • St Johns wort (Hypericum) helps to maintain emotional balance and positives moods by increasing levels of serotonin in the brain.
  • Spirulina (blue-green algae) helps to promote positive effects on mood because of its nutrient content, in particularly Phenylethylamine which mimics the love hormone.

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Osteoarthritis

Osteoarthritis is simply the wear and tear of the cartilage in the joint. The cartilage provides protection for the bones and helps to absorb shock. Osteoarthritis causes pain, inflammation and stiffness.

What can I do?

Consume an anti-inflammatory diet consisting of 7 portions of vegetables per day and 2 fruits. Eliminate refined sugars from the diet, and limit white potatoes, ball peppers, rhubarb, raw tomatoes and aubergines.

Balance blood sugars by eating complex carbohydrates and protein every 2.5 to 3 hours. This helps to avoid peaks and dips which can trigger inflammation.

Bone broth is a rich source of nutrients that provide many amino acids and nutrients for cartilage and joints.

What can I take?

  • Molybdenum contributes to normal sulphur amino acid metabolism for the maintenance of joints. It is available singularly or in a complex of trace minerals.
  • Vitamin C contributes to normal collagen formation for the normal function of cartilage.
  • Boswellia Supports joint flexibility and helps keep joints cool and comfortable.
  • Curcumin helps maintain the health of joints and bones. It is known to be a COX 2 inhibiter (Anti-inflammatory)
  • Collagen is found in large quantities in the cartilage of the joints. Damaged cartilage needs the correct amino acids for repair. Collagen supplements are broken down into the amino acids and used by the body.

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Pregnancy

Pregnancy is a demanding time of the mother’s body. A pregnant woman needs to correct nutrition to support herself and her rapidly growing baby.

What can I do?

Eat a nutrient rich diet. This includes 7 portions of organic vegetables per day and 2 fruits. All grains should be whole grains for the extra nutrition and fibre, and good levels of protein and healthy fats should be included.

Relax. Relaxed mothers give birth to more relaxed babies.

Reduce your chemical exposure. Switch to chemical free toiletries and cosmetics. Anything that goes on your skin goes in your skin, and into the blood which supplies your baby with nutrition.

What can I take?

  • Pregnancy multi is essential and helps to increase your nutrition intake. They will provide the recommended level of folic acid, and many other essential nutrients for you and your baby.
  • Pregnancy fish oil contains slightly higher levels of omega 3 DHA. Maternal intake of omega 3 DHA contributes to the normal brain development of the foetus and breastfed infants.
  • Live culture (also known as probiotic). During natural childbirth, the baby’s face, ears, nose, eyes and mouth gets covered with vaginal secretions which contain beneficial bacteria. This bacteria then influences the health of the baby. The mother needs to ensure that she has good levels of live cultures in her body. Ensure that you chose a live culture that is safe for pregnancy.

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Sleep

Poor sleep and insomnia affects a large percentage of the population and can dramatically affect quality of life and health status.

What can I do?

Get into a regular sleep pattern. This sets your body’s natural rhythm and helps you achieve better sleep.

Switch off all electrical appliances and dim the lights for a minimum of 30 minutes before bedtime. The lighting prevents our body from producing the sleep hormone melatonin.

Consume a nutrient rich diet. A diet rich in protein and essential fats is needed to provide the ingredients for the production of sleep hormones.

Meditate for 20 minutes before bed. This helps the mind to relax and for you to process thoughts effectively. Essential oils may also be beneficial for relaxation.

What can I take?

  • 5HTP is converted in the body into the sleep hormone melatonin, which helps in regulating sleep cycles and getting us to sleep. 5HTP should be take 30minutes before bed.
  • Magnesium contributes to the normal function of the immune system and normal physiological function. It works in balance with calcium. Calcium causes the muscle to contract, and magnesium causes them to relax, which is often needed for proper relaxation and sleep.
  • Omega 3 fats provide the basic ingredient for sleep hormones, and without these, sleep may be problematic.
  • Lemon balm supports healthy sleep and should be taken before bed.

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Sports Performance

During sporting activities, our performance greatly depends on our ability to focus, control our bodies and produce energy and have to muscle tone in order to carry out certain movements. When we are lacking in any of these, our performance is impaired and frustration may set in. Different goals means different protocols, however, the basics are the same.

What can I do?

Ensure adequate protein consumption. Protein is required for the creation and maintenance of muscle mass so a deficiency can seriously impair performance. Too much protein on the other hand can cause too much stress on the kidneys so it is important to get it right. 1.1g to 1.4g of protein per kg of body weight is recommended for exercising adults; however this can again be tailored to your exercise type and duration.

Ensure adequate carbohydrate consumption. This is essential for ensuring that there is enough sugar stores in your muscles to power you along. Carbohydrate intake can be tailored to your gain/ weight loss goals.

Ensure a nutrient rich diet. Nutrients such as magnesium, calcium, B1, B3, B5, B6, B12 and vitamin C are all needed for the production of energy, so a diet containing 7 portions or vegetables and 2-3 fruits per day will go a long way to helping you achieve a high nutrient intake.

Hydrate. Even a small amount of dehydration can affect performance and motivation. Proper hydration takes a couple of days, so it is important to ensure adequate hydration even on rest days.

Practice timings! Timings of carbohydrate and supplement intake can make a huge difference. It is important to get these timings well practiced before an event.

What can I take?

  • Protein. Ideally, protein would be taken 2 hours before exercising and within 30 minutes after. Having a protein shake is an easy to way increase protein intake when at the gym or field or studio side. Protein powder can also be used to bake with for delicious protein packed snacks.
  • Pre-work out formula containing carbohydrates, branched chain amino acids and B vitamins may go a long way to aiding performance. Branched chain amino acids are building blocks of protein in the body which helps to maintain existing muscle mass, so may be particularly useful in long distance and endurance events.
  • Recovery formula containing protein, carbohydrates and antioxidants. Protein is needed for the repair of muscle and carbohydrates to replace used muscle glucose stores. Antioxidants may help to mop up any and free radical damaged caused during the physical activity.
  • Electrolytes are minerals that make up part of your blood chemistry. They help to control the rate in which your cells hydrate. Electrolytes can be added in to juice to make a sports drink and with the carbohydrates from the juice, helps you with endurance events.
  • Multivitamin and mineral formula may provide the nutrition that your body needs for energy production such as phosphorus, manganese, iodine and copper. Calcium, magnesium and vitamin D contribute to normal muscle function
  • Creatine helps to increases physical performance in successive bursts of short-term, high intensity exercise, so is perfect for weight lifting or any strength and resistance exercise. Creatine helps to pull nutrition into the muscle cells for use.

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Stress

Excess stress is a major problem for people in the UK, and many health conditions and days taken off work are simply due to stress. Humans are designed to deal with short bursts of stress and not with the chronic stress that we see in today’s society.

What can I do?

Meditation is a powerful tool in helping us to cope with stress. A regular routine of 20 minutes of meditation per day can be effective.

Consume a nutrient rich diet which consists of 7 portions of vegetables per day and 2 fruits, adequate protein and healthy fats. This will provide the basic nutrients to support your body through stressful times.

Balance blood sugars. This means eating complex carbohydrates and protein every 2.5 to 3 hours. This helps to prevent blood sugar dips and highs and supports the adrenal glands – the glands that produce stress hormones.

What can I take?

  • Adrenal formula contains B vitamins such as vitamin B1, B2, B3 and B12 which are needed for normal functioning of the nervous system. They also contain chromium which supports normal glucose metabolism which is essential for the adrenal glands.
  • Omega fats provide the basic ingredient for hormone and neurotransmitter production.
  • L-Theanine gets converted in the body to dopamine, serotonin and GABA which are neurotransmitters that helps us to deal with stress.
  • Lemon balm helps to decrease tension and may be particularly beneficial in the evening time before bed.
  • Magnesium contributes to the normal function of the nervous system, and when we are stressed, our body uses up its valuable stores. Most of the UK do not consume enough magnesium in their diet, and lifestyle factors such as stress extenuate this problem.

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Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)

Urinary tract infections (UTIs), affect woman more than men, but can be troublesome for both. The causative bacteria is usually E.coli that has spread from the anus and causes pain, irritation and the need for frequent urination. Any UTI should be checked out by your doctor.

What can I do?

Decrease excess dietary sugar as this decreases the ability of the immune system and allows an infection to thrive. Focus on consuming whole unprocessed foods.

Consume a nutrient rich diet with 7 portions of vegetables per day and 2 fruits. Also include good quality protein and healthy fats. This should provide you with nutrients such as vitamin A, C, and D which are needed for the immune system.

Wipe front to back ladies! This is essential to prevent the spread of bacteria from the anus to the urethra.

Urinate after sex. This is important as urine helps to wash out any bacteria that may have entered the urethra during sex.

Hydrate. A minimum of 2 litres of water per day is advised to help keep the flow of liquid moving through the bladder.

What can I take?

  • Live culture exists naturally in the gut, both pathogenic and non-pathogenic. Pathogenic bacteria such as E.coli may commute from the anus to the urethra. Bacteria species such as lactobacillus also exists in the gut compete with E.coli for space.
  • Cranberry needs to be taken in the form of an extract rather than cranberry juice. Cranberry juice contains large amounts of sugar which is not present in cranberry extracts. Cranberry extracts contain larger amounts of the active ingredient, so a supplement is recommended.
  • D mannose. E.coli has tiny fingers which are coated in lectin. D mannose binds to the lectin and makes the E.coli fingers unable to adhere to the urinary tract wall, allowing them to be washed out with urine flow.
  • Vitamin C is needed for a normal immune system. When we have an infection, our need or vitamin C dramatically increases to levels that are difficult to achieve from diet alone.
  • Vitamin D is needed for the normal function of the immune system and our ability to fight off infection. Most of the UK population are vitamin D deficient, however vitamin D does get stored in the body so a test a vitamin D test is always advisable.

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Weight Loss

Obesity and being over-weight may have many causes. Excess calories in verses calories out is one factor, as well as binge eating, sugar cravings, low thyroid function and genetic factors may be present.

What can I do?

Balance blood sugars by eating complex carbohydrates and protein every two and a half to three hours. This prevents spikes and dips in blood glucose which helps to prevent sugar cravings and helps to maintain energy throughout the day helping you become more active.

Ensure that you diet consist of 7 portions of vegetables and 2 low sugar fruits daily. Combine this with whole grains for a low calorie, nutrient dense diet. The fibre in these foods provide bulk which may help to make you feel fuller for longer.

Exercise is important for burning calories, as well as building lean muscle mass, which then increases the rate in which you burn calories in your day to day life.

What can I take?

  • Chromium contributes to the maintenance of normal blood glucose levels. Steady glucose levels promote steady energy levels and encourage the burning of fat, especially from the middle.
  • Konjac fibre, also known as glucomannan contributes towards weight loss when it is combined with a calorie restricted diet. Konjac fibre works by providing bulk with very little calories.
  • Meal replacements designed for weight loss, which when replace one meal per day contribute to weight loss and helps you to maintain weight after your goal has been reached.
  • Yarrow is a herb that may stimulate weight loss.
  • Aloe Vera is a cactus which helps to maintain normal body weight and supports weight control.
  • Spirulina is a type of dried blue-green algae that helps with weight control.
  • Green tea helps with weight control by stimulating metabolism and the break-down of fat. It also helps to reduce appetite, which helps you consume less calories.
  • Protein contributes to the building of muscle mass. Having extra lean muscle mass not only keeps you fit and tones, it also increases the rate in which you burn calories.

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